Speakers

Dr. Lee Brown

Dr. Lee Brown

Lee Brown is the coordinator of the Indigenous Doctoral Program in the Department of Educational Studies at The University of British Columbia where he wrote his thesis entitled: Making the Classroom a Healthy Place: The Develop of Affective Competency in Aboriginal Pedagogy.. He is the Co-author of The Sacred Tree, an educational curriculum based in Aboriginal values and epistemology. Lee has also contributed to the Round Lake Native Healing Centre in Vernon, BC during the last twenty-six years in a number of capacities including clinical supervisor and currently as a cultural resource to the centre. He has been the keynote speaker at many Aboriginal conferences including the Awassis Education Conference held each year in Saskatoon. He has been an invited to share his knowledge of culture and healing in over five hundred indigenous communities in North America. Lee is a member of the Cherokee Nation and the Wolf Clan.

Lee is currently coordinator of the Emotional Education Initiative at UBC and is a member of the Indigenous Education Institute of Canada. In addition, he was a founding member of the Global Emotional Education Association.

Lee has developed a theory of holistic emotional education that is predicated upon six principles of emotional competency that arise out of his research in the area of affective education and learning. Lee also facilitates the annual Emotional Education Conference and is a co-founder of the Global Emotional Education Association. Lee is published in Academic Journals on the subject of Emotional Education including the Canadian Journal of Native Education and AlterNative: A New Zealand International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship. Lee was the guest editor of the UBC Educational Leadership Journal in March of 2007.

Dr. Jo-Ann Archibald

Dr. Jo-Ann Archibald

A visionary, a lecturer, an author and an academic, Dr. Jo-Ann Archibald is an agent of change and unrivaled pioneer in the advancement of First Nations education. Born in Chilliwack and a member of the Sowahlie First Nation, Dr. Archibald finished her undergraduate degree at the University of British Columbia. She continued her specialization in Education, earning both a Masters degree and Ph.D. at Simon Fraser University. While teaching elementary school, Dr. Archibald noted the lack of culturally relevant curriculum for First Nations students. She worked with teachers and elders from the Coqualeetza Cultural Centre to develop the first curriculum on the history of the Sto:lo people for elementary and secondary students. Since moving to the post-secondary system, Dr. Archibald has continued to create positive changes for First Nations students. As a member of the Board of Directors of the First Nations House of Learning at the University of British Columbia, Dr. Archibald assisted many faculties with the development and implementation of First Nation initiatives in Arts, Agricultural Sciences, Applied Sciences, Law, and Health Sciences to name a few. She led the fundraising campaign to establish a First Nations library, a child-care centre and fully-equipped computer laboratory. As the President of the Mokakit Education Research Association, Dr. Archibald developed national curriculum on HIV/Aids, Aboriginal heroes, and alcohol and substance abuse prevention. Dr. Archibald was supervisor of the Native Indian Teachers Education Program (NITEP), teaching, mentoring, and advising many First Nations graduate students. She has published frequently and has served as editor of the Canadian Journal of Native Education. Internationally, Dr. Archibald helped establish a formal relationship between the University of British Columbia and the University of Auckland in New Zealand and is the director for the International Research Institute for Maori and Indigenous Education. She has also traveled to China to lecture on curriculum development for Tibetan students. In 1995, Dr. Archibald received the Justice Achievement Award, an international award from the National Association for Court Management for her development of First Nations justice curriculum.

Nathan Matthew

Nathan Matthew

Nathan Matthew is a Simpcw First Nation member who lives in Chu Chua, B.C. He represented the Simpcw First Nation as Chief for 17 years and he represented the Secwepemc as Chair of the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council for 2 terms. Nathan has been actively involved in Aboriginal education for over 25 years. He has served on committees and councils at the local, provincial and national levels including the B.C. First Nations Education Steering Committee, the Provincial Chiefs Action Committee on Education, the First Nations Education Council (S.D. 73), and the National Education Committee for the Assembly of First Nations. Nathan played a key role in the passage of the groundbreaking Education Jurisdiction legislation passed by the House of Commons and the B.C. Legislative Assembly. Recently Nathan took the position of the first ever Executive Director of Aboriginal Education at Thompson Rivers University.

Nathan has a Masters Degree in Education from the University of British Columbia and an honorary Doctorate from Thompson Rivers University.

Nathan’s deep commitment to quality education for Aboriginal learners has been a prime focus of his career as a political and educational leader.

Dr. Lorna B Williams

Dr. Lorna B Williams

Dr. Lorna Williams is a Canada Research Chair, Indigenous Knowledge and Learning, in a partnership between Faculty of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. She is also Director of Aboriginal Education and Aboriginal Teacher Education and Manager of the Developmental Standard Term Certificate in First Nations Language and Culture.

Dr. Williams is a member of the Lil’wat First Nation and is a highly respected leader in Aboriginal and First Nations education and Indigenous cultures and traditions. From 2001 through 2004, Dr. Williams was the Director of Aboriginal Education Enhancements Branch for the British Columbia Ministry of Education. Dr. Williams’ knowledge of and experience working with all Aboriginal communities in British Columbia will be key to the design and implementation of the project—particularly the establishment of community-based committees and development of research protocols with diverse Aboriginal communities.

Dr. Williams’ research interests include Aboriginal education, Indigenous science, Aboriginal teacher education, Indigenous knowledge and wisdom, Indigenous language revitalization and maintenance, cross-cultural education, anti-racism education and teacher development. Two major areas of research and program delivery are 1.) The Aboriginal Science Project, where 15 researchers at the masters and doctoral levels are examining research of why Aboriginal students are under-represented in secondary school and university science courses and documenting Indigenous science knowledge and 2.) Dr. Williams manages, teaches, and researches Indigenous teaching, learning concepts and principles, and Indigenous language revitalization. Dr. Williams did her doctoral work at the University of Tennessee in Educational Psychology, with a specialty in collaborative learning.

Sue Gower

Sue Gower is Principal of Chalo School, which is owned and operated by the Fort Nelson First Nation. Chalo School has been nationally recognized for excellence in its instructional programs based on student achievement data.